Mixed-use Facilities Regain Popularity

March 2006 » Business Briefs
Cities across the country are experiencing a renaissance of mixed-use facilities, according to experts quoted in a recent article in Buildings magazine. Suman Sorg, president of the Washington, D.C.-based architecture firm Sorg and Associates tells the publication that mixed-use is coming back. She said the growing movement is in placing residential space above retail facilities. The biggest trend is in converting old office space into mixed-use developments, and the trend is not only centered in U.S. downtowns. The movement also is migrating to college campuses and the hospitality industry. Sorg said hotels around the nation are creating mixed-use buildings to cope with the seasonal ups and downs in occupancy rates. “As cities and downtowns become good places to live, other things will improve as well,” Sorg told the magazine. “Things like transportation, better schools … cities will become very desirable places in which to live.”

Cities across the country are experiencing a renaissance of mixed-use facilities, according to experts quoted in a recent article in Buildings magazine. Suman Sorg, president of the Washington, D.C.-based architecture firm Sorg and Associates tells the publication that mixed-use is coming back. She said the growing movement is in placing residential space above retail facilities.

The biggest trend is in converting old office space into mixed-use developments, and the trend is not only centered in U.S. downtowns. The movement also is migrating to college campuses and the hospitality industry. Sorg said hotels around the nation are creating mixed-use buildings to cope with the seasonal ups and downs in occupancy rates.

“As cities and downtowns become good places to live, other things will improve as well,” Sorg told the magazine. “Things like transportation, better schools … cities will become very desirable places in which to live.”


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